Another Opportunity to bring Joy to Kids, with “Stardust Explores the Solar System”!

Now we have another opportunity.  The success of “My Name is Stardust”, including radio shows and worldwide recognition has led to a second edition, “Stardust Explores the Solar System”, which has a kickstarter campaign being launched today! 

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“Getting to Naturalism the Long Way Around” by Christopher Stanley

Naturalism is a perspective that seeks to correct that error of interpretation. It seeks to pull away the countless layers of separatist story we began cultivating some ten thousand years ago along with our first crops. It seeks to restore a conscious experience of our sentient relationship with the world. And in doing so, also return us to a lived awareness of the true beauty, mystery, and sacredness of the world that is our birthright.

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How Our Brains Often Get Things Wrong, by Brock Haussamen

If you’re feeling cynical about people and their errors and foolishness, a place to go to buttress your mood is Wikipedia’s List of Cognitive Biases. It describes more than 150 ways in which our thinking systematically deviates from objective observation and…

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Survivors and the Terminator, by Brock Haussamen

Horseshoe crabs, after half a billion years, still crowd the beach.  (delaware-surf-fishing.com) The story of biological evolution recounts the ways that most plants and animals have changed over time as small bodily variations improved their odds of survival. But what…

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Why Naturalism? Because This.

Yet another example of a Pagan in a leadership position using that position for sexual misconduct, citing woo-woo “spiritual” reasons involving disembodied entities and “magical bonds” as “explanations” for his abuse. How far would such hokum fly in a naturalistic Pagan community? Not. At all. Willingness to take someone’s word about supposed supernatural processes and … Continue reading Why Naturalism? Because This.

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Naturalistic Animism: Seeing the Trees for the Ents

It takes an artist’s eyes—or a lover’s—to really see. It takes a willingness to get our hands dirty, to get up close and personal with messy nature, and to use all of our senses. But most of all, it requires a willingness to be open to receiving, as well as perceiving—an openness to being “touched back” when we touch nature.

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